Live Inspired: an introduction

• Brought to you by John Reamer and Associates •

I am extremely excited to officially announce my new partnership with John Reamer and Associates!

Every week, I’ll be sharing a short story about my travels here and on the John Reamer and Associates social media pages, under the banner Live Inspired.

My first post…

For the last eight years, I’ve worked as a newspaper reporter at the Minneapolis Star Tribune and have lived a mostly happy, mostly comfortable existence.

But last month, I gave all that up. I quit my job, I sold all my things and said goodbye to my house.

Why? Because I was inspired to pursue a lifelong dream instead — traveling the world with an open itinerary. And in order to do so, I’m severely pushing myself out of my comfort zone. After a few weeks on the road (hola from Mexico!), I have a new appreciation for some of the basic amenities I’ve lost: hot showers, clean bathrooms, a kitchen to cook in and even conditioner (I’m carrying my life on my back, so toiletry items are very limited).

Still, I’m inspired to keep trekking, to see new things, to meet new people, to challenge myself, to find gratitude for things I’ve long taken for granted, to better understand a corner of the world so different from my own.

Along the way, I’ll be sharing my experiences, my victories and my struggles. Already, it’s been emotional… and I’m only just beginning. I hope you come along for the ride.

Mexico City guide: go forth, eat on the streets

Ciudad de México, or CDMX as its commonly abbreviated, is known for its historical beauty, it’s vibrant, bustling vibe and it’s incomparable style — represented in both high design and fashion, and the colorful street art that graces just about every block.

Mexico’s capital boasts world-class museums, epic public markets and sophistication that comes along with being one of the world’s largest cities.

But in a sprawling metro that seemingly has it all, Mexico City’s greatest treasure might come via lowly rolling carts bedecked with griddles.

Yep, the street tacos are incredible, and a trip isn’t complete without them.

In fact, Mexico City’s street food is so skillfully made and so nuanced in variety that UNESCO recognized the cart grub as “an intangible cultural heritage of mankind” in 2010. Pretty good for stuff made in a kitchen the size of a small closet.

Here’s what you need to know to eat like a pauper and a king, simultaneously:

My nomadic journal: early struggles

On the night before I boarded a plane with a one-way ticket to Mexico, I was out to eat with my family, and my sister asked me if I was nervous.

“Nope,” I said, stuffing my face with North Carolina barbecue. 

“But — do you have butterflies?” she pressed.

“I actually don’t,” I said.

I was being honest. On the eve of the biggest decision of my life, my greatest adventure, my greatest challenge, I was certain: I was going to kick ass. 

I had no doubts. Traveling like this, on my own with no itinerary, was what I had always wanted to do. It was what I was meant to do.

Two weeks into my nomad existence, I can hardly write those sentences without tearing up. Yep, that’s right. I’m close to crying right now. I’ve been crying a lot.

CITY GUIDE: Pittsburgh

Pittsburgh typically doesn’t get mentioned in the conversation about the country’s top cities— but don’t expect to find a chip on the locals’ shoulders over that perception. Based on the conversations I’ve had while traversing the hilly scape, Pittsburghers seem content to keep their bounty a secret. 

But make no mistake: the Steel City has world-class food, architecture, and views to offer across a slate of highly walkable neighborhoods that rival those of its Northeast compatriots that are often heaped with much more attention. 

Grab a picnic and stroll to the edge of Pointe State Park in the heart of downtown to see, up close, the Allegheny and Monongahela rivers converge. Or take a ride up the historic Duquesne  Incline for that same view from above, compete with perspective of the bridges and city skyline. Buy insanely cheap, insanely fresh seafood on the Strip. Sip craft cocktails in East Liberty’s fresh new Ace Hotel. Or test the city’s next wave of restaurants in one of its incubator kitchens.

Best of all: Pittsburgh has authored its impressive turnaround following the collapse of the steel industry without harming the gritty spirit that bleeds through. It’s cool without pretension, full of quality finds without approaching extravagance. Don’t check the rental prices or else you might be enticed to stay.

In the meantime, here’s where you should eat, drink and play: 

CITY GUIDE: Raleigh. N.C.

When I moved to downtown Raleigh in 2005, people quietly warned me to buy a firearm.

Then, abandoned storefronts lined prime street corners, drug deals went down in the open and not much existed in the way of restaurants, save for the sports bar where I worked and a handful of other options.

Life in downtown Raleigh couldn’t feel much different now and yet, it somehow still feels like the same city to me every time I make the jaunt back. The City of Oaks has managed to hold onto its charming architecture, it’s blue collar feel and its beautiful, tree-lined streets— the best of its assets remain, while its dangerous overlay has been greatly diminished.

Still small, the 10-some square blocks boast lush city parks, an impressively diverse array of eating and drinking opportunities and a vibrant, lived-in feel at every time of day. I’ve seen many small city downtowns remade in this era of revitalization, but few as authentically and gracefully as Raleigh. The only proof necessary is how eagerly its residents have embraced the changes.

Here’s where you should eat, drink and play:

A loveletter to Minneapolis

Dear Minneapolis,

When I came to you in 2010, I was just 24, an intern, and eager to charge into a new city for what I thought would be three months.

When the summer ended, and I was offered a full-time job to stay, I still believed I would only stick around for two years, max. I was on a tear, then.  I wanted to live everywhere and never slow down.

But you wrapped your tree-trunk arms around me, showing me a metropolitan area with so much green. A place where you could bike to sky-scrapers in 10 minutes and bike to a lake in five. A town with top-tier options for eating, drinking and the arts but a blue-collar vibe. A city with with quirky neighborhoods, charming street corners and much more diversity than meets the eye.

I made OK money and didn’t pay too much for rent. There wasn’t a place in the city I couldn’t get by bike.

I decided to stay for a while.

GALLERY: Ocracoke Island, N.C.

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CITY GUIDE: Ocracoke Island, N.C.

Ocracoke Village, on North Carolina’s Outer Banks, is one of the most unique places in the country.

Despite being surrounded by other islands characterized by corporate chains, sprawling resorts and big-money tourism, Ocracoke has remained quiet and slow-paced, due to its physical distance from the mainland — it’s still accessible only by boat  — and its proud, centurys-long history of isolation. The beaches are nearly untouched. The fishing is exceptional. And 15 miles of undeveloped island surround the quaint, 4-square-mile village.

To get here, you’ll need to fly into a major airport (RDU and JAX are options), then drive several hours to either Swan Quarter, Cedar Island or Cape Hatteras to take an 45-minute to 3-hour ferry (depending on your starting point).

Here’s where you should eat, drink and play when you arrive:

stuff your life

How to stuff your life into four boxes

Step 1: Have some things, maybe a lot of things, and a place to live, maybe you even really like that place, and a vibrant, complex life stationed somewhere, maybe it’s kind of great.

Step 2: Remove 98 percent of step one.

Welcome to my insane life! I’m currently in the process of removing 98 percent of it and stuffing the rest into four oversized plastic bins.