Star Tribune column: a tour of Civil Rights landmarks reveals what’s changed and what hasn’t

While recently traveling from Missouri to North Carolina, I embarked on a somewhat spontaneous 10-day road trip through the former Jim Crow south.

It gave me the opportunity to visit a lot of Civil Rights landmarks I never have, and to do so amidst the backdrop of the current Black Lives Matters movement.

But my journey from Memphis to Atlanta, stopping in Jackson, MS, Selma, AL and Birmingham, AL in between, also struck me as a gauge of just how far we have to go — from the homeless camps in walking distance from MLK’s home, to the abject poverty evident in a hitchhiker’s neighborhood, to the thinly veiled racism I witnessed on the streets of Memphis.

Transpiring simultaneously with the demonstrations fighting police brutality that have seized widespread attention, these quiet injustices — the faces of which are still overwhelmingly Black — manage to persist, I found, in relative anonymity.

I wrote a column about the trip for my former employer, the Star Tribune — please give it a read!

Read the column here.

2 thoughts on “Star Tribune column: a tour of Civil Rights landmarks reveals what’s changed and what hasn’t

  1. I spent lots of time in Memphis in the late 90s. It would not have occurred to me that the home ownership rate was that high, but it is astounding what the housing crisis did to turn owners into renters and investors into landlords.

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